Friday, April 13, 2007

On Tap...

Roubaix, Roubaix, Roubaix...
This weekend its all about the Queen of the Classics, Paris - Roubaix. Missing is American George Hincapie, whose annual run at the podium is compelling enough reason to watch the race. But with all the recent carnage in the past week coupled with injuries to some of the pre-race favorites, this year's Roubaix could be anyone's to win. Gent-Wevelgem winner and E3 podium placer, Marcus Burkhardt, will be riding a wave of confidence that could possibly vault him past the likes of Boonen and Cancellara. While the shadow of Ronde winner, Alessandro Ballan, looms even larger having skipped Gent. Can Tom Boonen bounce back from his header during Flanders? Can Fabian Cancellara repeat his dominant ride from last year? Is this the year a Spaniard, Juan Antonio Flecha, snatches the crown jewel?

Translation: "One Day In Hell"

The route has been updated but remains relatively the same, tortuous. A new cobbled section has been added. Named after a past Roubaix winner and current Fran├žaise de Jeux Director Sportif, Marc Madiot, it will mark the 13th cobbled section of 28 on the day. Strangely, I can feel both my teeth clattering and my bones vibrating just sitting here thinking about the pave. Fortunately for the riders, it looks as if the pave may be bone dry, which means choking on dust rather than riding in cyclocross conditions.

Watch it LIVE on Cycling.tv or catch the Versus coverage that begins at 5pm EST. For internet coverage, follow it on Cyclingnews.com.

Misery Loves Company
Having a crisis and feel as if you need to be a part of what your watching, but don't really want to ride outside in the cold, then delve into A Sunday in Hell. This documentary of the 1976 Paris-Roubaix follows the battle between Merckx, Maartens, De Vlaeminck, and Moser.

From Holly Ordway (DVDTalk.com):
"The cover copy on the case of A Sunday in Hell describes it as 'arguably the best film ever made about professional cycling,' and it's no exaggeration. A Sunday in Hell is that rare and delightful creature, a documentary that offers a perceptive and interesting introduction to cycling for viewers who are new to the sport, while at the same time providing a great viewing experience for those who are already fans."

Happy, Funny, Bike Film
Is all the above a little too much right now? In dire need of a pick me up rather than being reminded about one of Dante's layers of Hell by the weather. Then what better bike related film to choose from the ROLL Film library than The 40 Year-Old Virgin. Granny's equivalent to a bowl of chicken soup, and the perfect remedy to winter cycling malaise.

What Borzo ("the bike guy") says:
One of the finest touches of the film, at least from a bicyclist's perspective, is how the bike (and his lack of a car) helps to establish who Andy is: frugal, sensible, gentle and unassuming. Notice how he handles his bike, obeys traffic signs, wears his helmet, and even signals his turns. More...

What Strauss ("the movie guy") says:
After a little over a year of reviewing bicycle films, the one constant I've observed is that Hollywood believes that normal people do not ride bikes. There are only four types of characters allowed to ride on the big screen (1) an athlete trying to win the big race, (2) someone who is poverty stricken and whose bicycle allows him or her to work, (3) a kid around the age of eleven, and (4) a nerd, geek, dweeb, etc. More...

No comments:

Friday, April 13, 2007

On Tap...

Roubaix, Roubaix, Roubaix...
This weekend its all about the Queen of the Classics, Paris - Roubaix. Missing is American George Hincapie, whose annual run at the podium is compelling enough reason to watch the race. But with all the recent carnage in the past week coupled with injuries to some of the pre-race favorites, this year's Roubaix could be anyone's to win. Gent-Wevelgem winner and E3 podium placer, Marcus Burkhardt, will be riding a wave of confidence that could possibly vault him past the likes of Boonen and Cancellara. While the shadow of Ronde winner, Alessandro Ballan, looms even larger having skipped Gent. Can Tom Boonen bounce back from his header during Flanders? Can Fabian Cancellara repeat his dominant ride from last year? Is this the year a Spaniard, Juan Antonio Flecha, snatches the crown jewel?

Translation: "One Day In Hell"

The route has been updated but remains relatively the same, tortuous. A new cobbled section has been added. Named after a past Roubaix winner and current Fran├žaise de Jeux Director Sportif, Marc Madiot, it will mark the 13th cobbled section of 28 on the day. Strangely, I can feel both my teeth clattering and my bones vibrating just sitting here thinking about the pave. Fortunately for the riders, it looks as if the pave may be bone dry, which means choking on dust rather than riding in cyclocross conditions.

Watch it LIVE on Cycling.tv or catch the Versus coverage that begins at 5pm EST. For internet coverage, follow it on Cyclingnews.com.

Misery Loves Company
Having a crisis and feel as if you need to be a part of what your watching, but don't really want to ride outside in the cold, then delve into A Sunday in Hell. This documentary of the 1976 Paris-Roubaix follows the battle between Merckx, Maartens, De Vlaeminck, and Moser.

From Holly Ordway (DVDTalk.com):
"The cover copy on the case of A Sunday in Hell describes it as 'arguably the best film ever made about professional cycling,' and it's no exaggeration. A Sunday in Hell is that rare and delightful creature, a documentary that offers a perceptive and interesting introduction to cycling for viewers who are new to the sport, while at the same time providing a great viewing experience for those who are already fans."

Happy, Funny, Bike Film
Is all the above a little too much right now? In dire need of a pick me up rather than being reminded about one of Dante's layers of Hell by the weather. Then what better bike related film to choose from the ROLL Film library than The 40 Year-Old Virgin. Granny's equivalent to a bowl of chicken soup, and the perfect remedy to winter cycling malaise.

What Borzo ("the bike guy") says:
One of the finest touches of the film, at least from a bicyclist's perspective, is how the bike (and his lack of a car) helps to establish who Andy is: frugal, sensible, gentle and unassuming. Notice how he handles his bike, obeys traffic signs, wears his helmet, and even signals his turns. More...

What Strauss ("the movie guy") says:
After a little over a year of reviewing bicycle films, the one constant I've observed is that Hollywood believes that normal people do not ride bikes. There are only four types of characters allowed to ride on the big screen (1) an athlete trying to win the big race, (2) someone who is poverty stricken and whose bicycle allows him or her to work, (3) a kid around the age of eleven, and (4) a nerd, geek, dweeb, etc. More...

No comments: