Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Rediscover Discovery

Good story on the revamped Discovey Channel team on the VeloNews site.

No Prologue for '08 Tour

The 2008 Tour de France will start without a prologue or time trial for the first time in 42 years. The Tour will start with a full road stage for the first time since 1966, organisers Christian Prudhomme and Jean-Yves Le Drian said last week.
Drian is the head of the Brittany's Regional Council, the French district that will host the race's first three stages next year. The 2008 race will start with a full stage between Brest to Plumelec. Stage two travels between Auray to Saint-Brieuc. The third stage leaves Brittany via Saint-Malo through the roads of Ile-et-Vilaine.
The Tour has left from Brest two times previously, the last time in 1974 where Eddy Merckx won a 7.1km prologue.
This year's Tour starts in London for the first-time ever. With a prologue.

Who Wouldn't Be Depressed?!

If you can forgive my fixation with Bad Boy Floyd Landis these days ... but now we learn the the 2006 Tour de France winner (he's still da champ!) has financial and mental problems, according to the San Bernardino Press Enterprise.
According to the newspaper, BBFL has already spent #2 million for attorneys and as a result of lawsuits. The newspaper estimates that Landis only has $150,000 left.
Besides his financial problems, the American is reportedly to be depressed.
Well, who the hell would not be!
Landis has said that ESPN that "it's almost sure I will have to skip the 2007 season."
Landis continues to attack the current system: "The best we can hope for is that the system changes and that nobody ever has to pass this. It should become more efficient and honest, and someone shouldn't have to spend one year of his life to prove his innoncence."
Hopefully, this will all be decided by March.

Monday, January 29, 2007

Sorry Floyd. Not My Job.

When Bad Boy Floyd Landis started up the Floyd Fairness Fund with hopes of raising up to $2 million dollars for his legal defense, my reaction was: Not my job.
Heck, Our Boy Lance raises millions for CANCER RESEARCH.
Fairness is all well and good, but cancer isn't particularly fair.
My money will keep going to cancer research.
To date, BBF has only raised $150,000 in contributions on a national tour, which included a stop in this area (Arlington). Admission was $25 -- plus additional donation, I'm sure. It would have been nice to attend and meet Floyd, but I passed. I'll write a check to cancer research instead.
Landis says he has spent about $350,000 of his own money on his defense against doping allegations during the Tour de France so far; he says he is is living on his past earnings. Landis will continue to hold these "townhall style meetings, discuss his legal defense and sign autographs.
What's Floyd been up to on the bike? According to the CyclingNews, he was in California for his annual training camp for amateur riders. Twenty-three cyclists, from as far away as New Zealand and Great Britain, paid $3,000 to attend the week-long camp. His mechanic, massage therapist and physiologist all worked with the riders. Landis rode with the amateurs six times for a total of about 300 miles. Landis is recovering from hip replacement surgery last fall.

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Comeback For Floyd?

Bad Boy Floyd Landis back in a race?
Landis is considering a comeback in the peloton at the American Continental Team Slipstream Powered by Chipotle.
Team Manager and former U.S. Postal rider Jonathan Vaughters (who I met and got to ride with in 2004 during the first week of the Tour de France in Belgium) told Cyclingnews that "we have talked, but a deal has not yet been made. However, if Landis fails to prove his innocence in the 2006 Tour de France, it does not make sense to keep negotiating."
Landis is still the official Tour de France winner, but he could be stripped of his dramatic victory if proven guilty for the use of testosterone during the 17th stage of the race.

Monday, January 22, 2007

Oscar In The Clear

The International Cycling Union has cleared Tour de France runner-up Oscar Pereiro of doping after he tested positive for the anti-asthma drug salbutamol.
"At the 2006 Tour de France, traces of this product were found in his urine," the UCI said in a statement. "However the results of tests during the race cannot be considered as a positive anti-doping control."
But not so fast, Oscar ...
The UCI said the Spaniard had shown "serious negligence" when he delayed providing evidence of a medical exemption to the French Anti-Doping Agency (AFLD) requested in September last year.
"Although he had medical justification requested from September 2006 by the AFLD proving that he indeed suffered from asthma brought on by physical exertion, Oscar Pereiro delayed providing it to this organisation," it said.
"This is considered as a failure to respect established administrative procedures. This serious negligence by the Spanish rider is regrettable and harms the image of cycling as a whole, although he is not guilty of any infringement."
Last week, the French daily Le Monde reported that Pereiro had twice tested positive for salbutamol during the Tour. Pereiro told Radio Marca last Thursday he had had an official medical exemption since March 2005.
The UCI said it asked the AFLD to refrain from publicly implying that a rider was guilty of a doping offense when he had committed an administrative fault only.
"Such an attitude does not help to support the cycling community, which is fighting more than ever against the phenomenon of doping."

Sunday, January 21, 2007

Through the English Countryside

Here's a look at the first stage of the 2007 Tour de France from London to Kent on July 8. The stage takes in the beautiful Kent countryside and finish in Canterbury.

Asthma Will Getcha Every Time

With classes resuming at George Mason University for the Spring semester on Monday, I need to update this blog more as an example for my Online Journalism class. They all must build a blog and maintain it as part of the course.
So ...
Did anyone else find it ironic that Tour de France runner-up Oscar Pereiro said he will send French authorities documentation of his waiver to take an asthma medication during the race — then wait for someone to "apologize" to him?!
The French newspaper Le Monde said Pereiro twice tested positive for salbutamol during the Tour. However, Pereiro said that the International Cycling Union had granted him a waiver for the asthma medication and was not pursuing sanctions against him.
French anti-doping officials, however, said they were not convinced the waiver was medically justified.
Pereiro could be awarded the title if Bad Boy Floyd Landis is stripped of the title as a result of his own doping allegation problems.

Monday, January 15, 2007

MLK Day - Team Major Taylor

Their original story ran in Bicycling last summer (June 2006), and T-o-03 posted a Boston Globe story about one of the original American cycling greats, Major Taylor. So in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day here in the states, Oude Granny presents a group of individuals whose goal is to someday win the famous Lil' 500 (an Indiana and All-American cycling tradition that a friend of mine once participated in and won), with an All African American team, Team Major Taylor (find the RACE .pdf on their welcome page for the full story).

Friday, January 12, 2007

I'm In, I'm Out, I'm In, I'm Out...

I'm In. Huh? Yes, that's the absolute best answer Oude Granny could provide after I read that the International Professional Cycling Tour (IPCT) group, who earlier booted Discovery Pro Cycling Team from participating in the Pro Tour, has now reinstated them. Why did they get booted in the first place, for hiring Ivan Basso, an ethics violation of the new IPCT as they had all decided that hiring anyone involved in Operacion Puerto would call for an immediate dismissal.

So why let them back in? Well here are some stereotypical answers, "money talks..." "different rules for different tax brackets..." "how do you exclude the team with perhaps the largest growing fanbase (and the one with a fanbase that travels and spends money in the EU)" "ethics don't matter, when it comes to money." Try one of those out for size. Way to stick to your ethical standards guys! Next thing you know they'll let guys dope freely and call it a sport.

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Armstrong: Washington Weakens Fight Against Cancer

By Lance Armstrong Special to CNN

Lance Armstrong, one of cycling's all-time greats and possibly the world's best known cancer survivor, founded the Lance Armstrong Foundation with the goal of inspiring and empowering people with cancer. He now campaigns for more government funds for cancer research and treatment.

AUSTIN, Texas (CNN) -- I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays. Impatience got me over countless mountain passes, across the finish line in New York City and through four rounds of ruthless chemotherapy 10 years ago.

Yet this election season I patiently waited to hear a candidate for office explain to constituents what he or she planned to do about one of the leading threats to the health and well-being of all Americans -- cancer. My patience was greeted with silence.

Cancer will impact one in two men and one in three women in their lifetime. It is devastating and it is pervasive. In fact, every year 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer.

Thankfully, our country has made tremendous progress in this fight and produced remarkable advances in the way we prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Today, in many cases, we can humbly say that cancer is no longer a death sentence. The medical advances achieved by our nation's best doctors and researchers have given us reasons to hope.

But in spite of this vast body of knowledge, 1,500 people will die from cancer today and tomorrow and the day after that, often because the care they needed to prevent cancer or survive it was not available to them.

However, our nation's second-leading killer did not make the list of issues that our candidates used to get people to the polls last November. Anyone with a television or access to a newspaper can list the ballot box issues that occupied our candidates' attention -- they range from bickering to very real concerns and challenges.

The political ads didn't tell voters that earlier in the year funding for cancer research was cut for the first time in 30 years. Nor did they explain that a lack of funding slows the pace of scientific discovery and the development of treatments. Our candidates did not mention the decrease in funding for programs that provide information and screening to people who need these services. I think this is unwise, but it is what our government has done this past year. I waited patiently for an explanation, some clarification or justification. Ten million cancer survivors deserve an answer. We didn't get one.

It is true that state and federal budgets are constrained by many important responsibilities. But cancer doesn't care about that.

It is time to hold our leaders accountable. It remains to be seen if the change in power on Capitol Hill will affect the fight against cancer. In two years we will elect a new president. We cannot predict the actions of any of our elected officials, but we can say for sure that when it comes to cancer their silence is unacceptable.

Patient people may accept the status quo, but the status quo isn't working for us. Instead, we need to stubbornly hold our leaders accountable and we need the courage to ask tough questions of our elected officials. Few issues facing our government are more personal or more critical than the health of our citizens. What are we going to do to effectively fight cancer? Millions of Americans with cancer are asking.

I'm not known for my patience. When it comes to cancer, I hope you aren't either.

Monday, January 08, 2007

Chip In Locally For Bad Boy Floyd

For $25 bucks, plus whatever largesse I careto muster, I can spend an evening with Bad Boy Floyd Landis at the Arlington, Va., Cinema N Drafthouse Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. to "help him raise awareness in the Floyd Fairness Fund" (see item below).
The event is being sponsored by my local bike shop, the Bike Lane, which is located in Burke, Va. For any local readers of this blog, there's advance registration.
The FFF was established to support BBFL in his efforts to clear his name of doping allegations during the 17th stage of the Tour de France last summer.

Friday, January 05, 2007

Got A Few Extra Bucks?

Looking for a worthy charity? How about the Floyd Fairness Fund, a website launched by a trio of Bad Boy Floyd Landis supporters that hopes to raise $2 million to defend the 2006 Tour de France champion against charges that he doped to win the race.
Landis, as we all know by now, tested positive for a skewed testosterone-epitestosterone ratio after the 2006 Tour de France and is preparing for arbitration before the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. He needs the money to cover legal fees and expenses, according to spokesman Michael Henson.

"Despite their lack of adherence to individual rights and due process ... the sports bureaucracies pursuing Floyd are funded in large part by multimillion-dollar grants of U.S. taxpayer dollars and have financial and human resources that far outstrip those of even a professional athlete of Floyd's accomplishments," Henson told Agence France.

A statement on the website says the fund was established "to support Floyd Landis in his efforts to clear his name of unsubstantiated doping allegations by providing him with the means to attain a fair and just hearing. Our mission is to support Floyd Landis against unsubstantiated doping allegations; to provide the means to attain fairness for Floyd; and to bring justice to those responsible for misconduct in the case."

The fund's website lists three principals: executive director Henson; trustee Dr. Arnie Baker, who has been helping Landis take his case to the public; and chairman Brian Rafferty, who is managing director and co-founder of Taylor Rafferty, a company specializing in investor-relations and financial-communications advice.

CyclingNews 2007 Road Team Database

Here's a great resource from CyclingNews: their team database for 2007 of ProTour and Pro Continental teams. Information is provisional and will be updated in the coming days and weeks as teams finalize their rosters.

Wednesday, January 03, 2007

More on Floyd and Doping

Some stories I missed on Bad Boy Floyd Landis's ever-ongoing battle with WADA and doping procedures:
-- The Daily Mail of London: Innocent man or drug cheat?
-- Los Angeles Times: Athletes' Unbeatable foe; anti-doping authorities serve as prosecutor, judge and jury; the innocent often pay a high price
-- Los Angeles Times: Athletes see doping case appeals as futile exercise
-- Los Angeles Times: Cyclist blames 'flawed' test; Tyler Hamilton says the blood exam that labeled him a 'cheater' was rushed into use
The LATimes pieces were all written by Michael Hiltzik, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and columnist. He won the investigative journalism award in 1999 for a series of co-written articles exposing corruption in the entertainment industry.
In the Daily Mail story, Landis say: "How can cycling win? Either the winner of its greatest race is a cheat or the credibility of the system is in tatters if I'm found innocent. Neither is a great result."

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

A New Year's Interview With Floyd

There's an interesting online interview with Bad Boy Floyd Landis by Cathy Mehl for the Daily Peleton.
What are BBFL's days like?
"I spend a good part of my day riding my bike and the rest of my time is mostly spent in meetings or on conference calls with the defense team. I’d rather ride all day, but that’s not the reality right now. Regardless, it’s good to be back on the bike for at least a few hours a day. It makes the other stuff more manageable.
"Considering how long this is going on, I don’t know if I’ll be able to race in 2007. I’d love nothing more than to be in London in July rolling down the start ramp with number 1 on my back. I just don’t know how long this is going to take.
"Regardless, it’s my goal and dream to get back and win the Tour de France again. Don’t mistake that! I’ve always had strength and resolve to fight, so that isn’t changing with the New Year. I’m not big on ceremony. I’d just like to get on with it."

New Discovery Channel Team Member

Olympic and Commonwealth medallist Steve Cummings has joined the Discovery Channel team.
Cummings, 25, is the current Commonwealth champion, 2005 World Champion and Olympic Silver medallist, all in Team Pursuit.
Cummings missed the pre-Christmas Discovery training camp in Austin but will participate in the team's California training camp this month.
Cummings hopes to participate in the Giro, but the Tour de France, which begins in London this year, is proably down the road.

Wednesday, January 31, 2007

Rediscover Discovery

Good story on the revamped Discovey Channel team on the VeloNews site.

No Prologue for '08 Tour

The 2008 Tour de France will start without a prologue or time trial for the first time in 42 years. The Tour will start with a full road stage for the first time since 1966, organisers Christian Prudhomme and Jean-Yves Le Drian said last week.
Drian is the head of the Brittany's Regional Council, the French district that will host the race's first three stages next year. The 2008 race will start with a full stage between Brest to Plumelec. Stage two travels between Auray to Saint-Brieuc. The third stage leaves Brittany via Saint-Malo through the roads of Ile-et-Vilaine.
The Tour has left from Brest two times previously, the last time in 1974 where Eddy Merckx won a 7.1km prologue.
This year's Tour starts in London for the first-time ever. With a prologue.

Who Wouldn't Be Depressed?!

If you can forgive my fixation with Bad Boy Floyd Landis these days ... but now we learn the the 2006 Tour de France winner (he's still da champ!) has financial and mental problems, according to the San Bernardino Press Enterprise.
According to the newspaper, BBFL has already spent #2 million for attorneys and as a result of lawsuits. The newspaper estimates that Landis only has $150,000 left.
Besides his financial problems, the American is reportedly to be depressed.
Well, who the hell would not be!
Landis has said that ESPN that "it's almost sure I will have to skip the 2007 season."
Landis continues to attack the current system: "The best we can hope for is that the system changes and that nobody ever has to pass this. It should become more efficient and honest, and someone shouldn't have to spend one year of his life to prove his innoncence."
Hopefully, this will all be decided by March.

Monday, January 29, 2007

Sorry Floyd. Not My Job.

When Bad Boy Floyd Landis started up the Floyd Fairness Fund with hopes of raising up to $2 million dollars for his legal defense, my reaction was: Not my job.
Heck, Our Boy Lance raises millions for CANCER RESEARCH.
Fairness is all well and good, but cancer isn't particularly fair.
My money will keep going to cancer research.
To date, BBF has only raised $150,000 in contributions on a national tour, which included a stop in this area (Arlington). Admission was $25 -- plus additional donation, I'm sure. It would have been nice to attend and meet Floyd, but I passed. I'll write a check to cancer research instead.
Landis says he has spent about $350,000 of his own money on his defense against doping allegations during the Tour de France so far; he says he is is living on his past earnings. Landis will continue to hold these "townhall style meetings, discuss his legal defense and sign autographs.
What's Floyd been up to on the bike? According to the CyclingNews, he was in California for his annual training camp for amateur riders. Twenty-three cyclists, from as far away as New Zealand and Great Britain, paid $3,000 to attend the week-long camp. His mechanic, massage therapist and physiologist all worked with the riders. Landis rode with the amateurs six times for a total of about 300 miles. Landis is recovering from hip replacement surgery last fall.

Tuesday, January 23, 2007

Comeback For Floyd?

Bad Boy Floyd Landis back in a race?
Landis is considering a comeback in the peloton at the American Continental Team Slipstream Powered by Chipotle.
Team Manager and former U.S. Postal rider Jonathan Vaughters (who I met and got to ride with in 2004 during the first week of the Tour de France in Belgium) told Cyclingnews that "we have talked, but a deal has not yet been made. However, if Landis fails to prove his innocence in the 2006 Tour de France, it does not make sense to keep negotiating."
Landis is still the official Tour de France winner, but he could be stripped of his dramatic victory if proven guilty for the use of testosterone during the 17th stage of the race.

Monday, January 22, 2007

Oscar In The Clear

The International Cycling Union has cleared Tour de France runner-up Oscar Pereiro of doping after he tested positive for the anti-asthma drug salbutamol.
"At the 2006 Tour de France, traces of this product were found in his urine," the UCI said in a statement. "However the results of tests during the race cannot be considered as a positive anti-doping control."
But not so fast, Oscar ...
The UCI said the Spaniard had shown "serious negligence" when he delayed providing evidence of a medical exemption to the French Anti-Doping Agency (AFLD) requested in September last year.
"Although he had medical justification requested from September 2006 by the AFLD proving that he indeed suffered from asthma brought on by physical exertion, Oscar Pereiro delayed providing it to this organisation," it said.
"This is considered as a failure to respect established administrative procedures. This serious negligence by the Spanish rider is regrettable and harms the image of cycling as a whole, although he is not guilty of any infringement."
Last week, the French daily Le Monde reported that Pereiro had twice tested positive for salbutamol during the Tour. Pereiro told Radio Marca last Thursday he had had an official medical exemption since March 2005.
The UCI said it asked the AFLD to refrain from publicly implying that a rider was guilty of a doping offense when he had committed an administrative fault only.
"Such an attitude does not help to support the cycling community, which is fighting more than ever against the phenomenon of doping."

Sunday, January 21, 2007

Through the English Countryside

Here's a look at the first stage of the 2007 Tour de France from London to Kent on July 8. The stage takes in the beautiful Kent countryside and finish in Canterbury.

Asthma Will Getcha Every Time

With classes resuming at George Mason University for the Spring semester on Monday, I need to update this blog more as an example for my Online Journalism class. They all must build a blog and maintain it as part of the course.
So ...
Did anyone else find it ironic that Tour de France runner-up Oscar Pereiro said he will send French authorities documentation of his waiver to take an asthma medication during the race — then wait for someone to "apologize" to him?!
The French newspaper Le Monde said Pereiro twice tested positive for salbutamol during the Tour. However, Pereiro said that the International Cycling Union had granted him a waiver for the asthma medication and was not pursuing sanctions against him.
French anti-doping officials, however, said they were not convinced the waiver was medically justified.
Pereiro could be awarded the title if Bad Boy Floyd Landis is stripped of the title as a result of his own doping allegation problems.

Monday, January 15, 2007

MLK Day - Team Major Taylor

Their original story ran in Bicycling last summer (June 2006), and T-o-03 posted a Boston Globe story about one of the original American cycling greats, Major Taylor. So in honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day here in the states, Oude Granny presents a group of individuals whose goal is to someday win the famous Lil' 500 (an Indiana and All-American cycling tradition that a friend of mine once participated in and won), with an All African American team, Team Major Taylor (find the RACE .pdf on their welcome page for the full story).

Friday, January 12, 2007

I'm In, I'm Out, I'm In, I'm Out...

I'm In. Huh? Yes, that's the absolute best answer Oude Granny could provide after I read that the International Professional Cycling Tour (IPCT) group, who earlier booted Discovery Pro Cycling Team from participating in the Pro Tour, has now reinstated them. Why did they get booted in the first place, for hiring Ivan Basso, an ethics violation of the new IPCT as they had all decided that hiring anyone involved in Operacion Puerto would call for an immediate dismissal.

So why let them back in? Well here are some stereotypical answers, "money talks..." "different rules for different tax brackets..." "how do you exclude the team with perhaps the largest growing fanbase (and the one with a fanbase that travels and spends money in the EU)" "ethics don't matter, when it comes to money." Try one of those out for size. Way to stick to your ethical standards guys! Next thing you know they'll let guys dope freely and call it a sport.

Wednesday, January 10, 2007

Armstrong: Washington Weakens Fight Against Cancer

By Lance Armstrong Special to CNN

Lance Armstrong, one of cycling's all-time greats and possibly the world's best known cancer survivor, founded the Lance Armstrong Foundation with the goal of inspiring and empowering people with cancer. He now campaigns for more government funds for cancer research and treatment.

AUSTIN, Texas (CNN) -- I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays. Impatience got me over countless mountain passes, across the finish line in New York City and through four rounds of ruthless chemotherapy 10 years ago.

Yet this election season I patiently waited to hear a candidate for office explain to constituents what he or she planned to do about one of the leading threats to the health and well-being of all Americans -- cancer. My patience was greeted with silence.

Cancer will impact one in two men and one in three women in their lifetime. It is devastating and it is pervasive. In fact, every year 1.3 million Americans are diagnosed with cancer.

Thankfully, our country has made tremendous progress in this fight and produced remarkable advances in the way we prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Today, in many cases, we can humbly say that cancer is no longer a death sentence. The medical advances achieved by our nation's best doctors and researchers have given us reasons to hope.

But in spite of this vast body of knowledge, 1,500 people will die from cancer today and tomorrow and the day after that, often because the care they needed to prevent cancer or survive it was not available to them.

However, our nation's second-leading killer did not make the list of issues that our candidates used to get people to the polls last November. Anyone with a television or access to a newspaper can list the ballot box issues that occupied our candidates' attention -- they range from bickering to very real concerns and challenges.

The political ads didn't tell voters that earlier in the year funding for cancer research was cut for the first time in 30 years. Nor did they explain that a lack of funding slows the pace of scientific discovery and the development of treatments. Our candidates did not mention the decrease in funding for programs that provide information and screening to people who need these services. I think this is unwise, but it is what our government has done this past year. I waited patiently for an explanation, some clarification or justification. Ten million cancer survivors deserve an answer. We didn't get one.

It is true that state and federal budgets are constrained by many important responsibilities. But cancer doesn't care about that.

It is time to hold our leaders accountable. It remains to be seen if the change in power on Capitol Hill will affect the fight against cancer. In two years we will elect a new president. We cannot predict the actions of any of our elected officials, but we can say for sure that when it comes to cancer their silence is unacceptable.

Patient people may accept the status quo, but the status quo isn't working for us. Instead, we need to stubbornly hold our leaders accountable and we need the courage to ask tough questions of our elected officials. Few issues facing our government are more personal or more critical than the health of our citizens. What are we going to do to effectively fight cancer? Millions of Americans with cancer are asking.

I'm not known for my patience. When it comes to cancer, I hope you aren't either.

Monday, January 08, 2007

Chip In Locally For Bad Boy Floyd

For $25 bucks, plus whatever largesse I careto muster, I can spend an evening with Bad Boy Floyd Landis at the Arlington, Va., Cinema N Drafthouse Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. to "help him raise awareness in the Floyd Fairness Fund" (see item below).
The event is being sponsored by my local bike shop, the Bike Lane, which is located in Burke, Va. For any local readers of this blog, there's advance registration.
The FFF was established to support BBFL in his efforts to clear his name of doping allegations during the 17th stage of the Tour de France last summer.

Friday, January 05, 2007

Got A Few Extra Bucks?

Looking for a worthy charity? How about the Floyd Fairness Fund, a website launched by a trio of Bad Boy Floyd Landis supporters that hopes to raise $2 million to defend the 2006 Tour de France champion against charges that he doped to win the race.
Landis, as we all know by now, tested positive for a skewed testosterone-epitestosterone ratio after the 2006 Tour de France and is preparing for arbitration before the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. He needs the money to cover legal fees and expenses, according to spokesman Michael Henson.

"Despite their lack of adherence to individual rights and due process ... the sports bureaucracies pursuing Floyd are funded in large part by multimillion-dollar grants of U.S. taxpayer dollars and have financial and human resources that far outstrip those of even a professional athlete of Floyd's accomplishments," Henson told Agence France.

A statement on the website says the fund was established "to support Floyd Landis in his efforts to clear his name of unsubstantiated doping allegations by providing him with the means to attain a fair and just hearing. Our mission is to support Floyd Landis against unsubstantiated doping allegations; to provide the means to attain fairness for Floyd; and to bring justice to those responsible for misconduct in the case."

The fund's website lists three principals: executive director Henson; trustee Dr. Arnie Baker, who has been helping Landis take his case to the public; and chairman Brian Rafferty, who is managing director and co-founder of Taylor Rafferty, a company specializing in investor-relations and financial-communications advice.

CyclingNews 2007 Road Team Database

Here's a great resource from CyclingNews: their team database for 2007 of ProTour and Pro Continental teams. Information is provisional and will be updated in the coming days and weeks as teams finalize their rosters.

Wednesday, January 03, 2007

More on Floyd and Doping

Some stories I missed on Bad Boy Floyd Landis's ever-ongoing battle with WADA and doping procedures:
-- The Daily Mail of London: Innocent man or drug cheat?
-- Los Angeles Times: Athletes' Unbeatable foe; anti-doping authorities serve as prosecutor, judge and jury; the innocent often pay a high price
-- Los Angeles Times: Athletes see doping case appeals as futile exercise
-- Los Angeles Times: Cyclist blames 'flawed' test; Tyler Hamilton says the blood exam that labeled him a 'cheater' was rushed into use
The LATimes pieces were all written by Michael Hiltzik, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and columnist. He won the investigative journalism award in 1999 for a series of co-written articles exposing corruption in the entertainment industry.
In the Daily Mail story, Landis say: "How can cycling win? Either the winner of its greatest race is a cheat or the credibility of the system is in tatters if I'm found innocent. Neither is a great result."

Tuesday, January 02, 2007

A New Year's Interview With Floyd

There's an interesting online interview with Bad Boy Floyd Landis by Cathy Mehl for the Daily Peleton.
What are BBFL's days like?
"I spend a good part of my day riding my bike and the rest of my time is mostly spent in meetings or on conference calls with the defense team. I’d rather ride all day, but that’s not the reality right now. Regardless, it’s good to be back on the bike for at least a few hours a day. It makes the other stuff more manageable.
"Considering how long this is going on, I don’t know if I’ll be able to race in 2007. I’d love nothing more than to be in London in July rolling down the start ramp with number 1 on my back. I just don’t know how long this is going to take.
"Regardless, it’s my goal and dream to get back and win the Tour de France again. Don’t mistake that! I’ve always had strength and resolve to fight, so that isn’t changing with the New Year. I’m not big on ceremony. I’d just like to get on with it."

New Discovery Channel Team Member

Olympic and Commonwealth medallist Steve Cummings has joined the Discovery Channel team.
Cummings, 25, is the current Commonwealth champion, 2005 World Champion and Olympic Silver medallist, all in Team Pursuit.
Cummings missed the pre-Christmas Discovery training camp in Austin but will participate in the team's California training camp this month.
Cummings hopes to participate in the Giro, but the Tour de France, which begins in London this year, is proably down the road.