Sunday, May 20, 2007

Landis: 'It wouldn't serve any purpose for me to cheat and win the Tour, because I wouldn't be proud of it.'

A brief look at Day 6 of the Floyd Landis arbitration hearing:

HIGHLIGHTS: Landis saying cheating goes against everything he stands for: "It wouldn't serve any purpose for me to cheat and win the Tour, because I wouldn't be proud of it."

LOWLIGHTS: Long, boring, confusing testimony over the telephone from German scientist Wilhelm Schnazer to start the day.

CONTROL THE MESSAGE: During cross-examination of former UCLA lab director Don Catlin, Landis attorneys pressed him on whether lab directors were compelled not to testify on behalf of athletes. They brought up Catlin's testimony in the case of Zach Lund, the skeleton racer who was suspended for a year for using a hair-restoration drug. Catlin acknowledged being pressured by World Anti-Doping Agency officials before his testimony. "One of them made a comment that this was about getting to the truth, as if to say I was not going to be providing the truth," Catlin said.

CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Catlin's most interesting revelation was that standards at the UCLA lab would call for at least two compounds of metabolized testosterone to surpass allowable limits for a test to be considered positive. WADA rules say it's only one, and Catlin was asked many times about this distinction under cross-examination by the Landis attorneys. Landis' positive sample only has one metabolite that is consistently over the threshold.

MONDAY'S WITNESSES: Cross-examination of Landis; Wolfram Meier-Augestein, a research scientist in the field of carbon-isotope ratio testing, from Landis' witness list.

MORE:
-- Gene Collier of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Cycling drama is pushing buttons, not pedals

No comments:

Sunday, May 20, 2007

Landis: 'It wouldn't serve any purpose for me to cheat and win the Tour, because I wouldn't be proud of it.'

A brief look at Day 6 of the Floyd Landis arbitration hearing:

HIGHLIGHTS: Landis saying cheating goes against everything he stands for: "It wouldn't serve any purpose for me to cheat and win the Tour, because I wouldn't be proud of it."

LOWLIGHTS: Long, boring, confusing testimony over the telephone from German scientist Wilhelm Schnazer to start the day.

CONTROL THE MESSAGE: During cross-examination of former UCLA lab director Don Catlin, Landis attorneys pressed him on whether lab directors were compelled not to testify on behalf of athletes. They brought up Catlin's testimony in the case of Zach Lund, the skeleton racer who was suspended for a year for using a hair-restoration drug. Catlin acknowledged being pressured by World Anti-Doping Agency officials before his testimony. "One of them made a comment that this was about getting to the truth, as if to say I was not going to be providing the truth," Catlin said.

CHEMICAL REACTIONS: Catlin's most interesting revelation was that standards at the UCLA lab would call for at least two compounds of metabolized testosterone to surpass allowable limits for a test to be considered positive. WADA rules say it's only one, and Catlin was asked many times about this distinction under cross-examination by the Landis attorneys. Landis' positive sample only has one metabolite that is consistently over the threshold.

MONDAY'S WITNESSES: Cross-examination of Landis; Wolfram Meier-Augestein, a research scientist in the field of carbon-isotope ratio testing, from Landis' witness list.

MORE:
-- Gene Collier of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Cycling drama is pushing buttons, not pedals

No comments: