Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Day 8: The Floyd Landis Hearing

A brief look at Day 8 of the Bad Boy Floyd arbitration hearing:

HIGHLIGHTS: Many observers thought USADA would stick to the science, and the Landis side would try to put on a big show. In fact, the opposite has happened. USADA's decision to bring Greg LeMond to the stand has turned this into an examination of Landis' character, as well, which is what Tuesday morning's cross-examination was all about. But do the arbitrators care?

LOWLIGHTS: Landis had another good witness, Simon Davis, who was compelling in his dissection of practices at the French lab. But if the Landis team's strategy was to get word of Davis' scientific testimony to the public, Landis' cross-examination proved to be too much competition.

LAB WORKERS GONE WILD: Davis ripped lab technicians Cynthia Mongongu and Claire Frelat, saying they "clearly did not understand the instrument" they used to manually reprocess data and claiming that some of their testimony "shows a complete lack of understanding of the instrument."

CHEMICAL REACTIONS: The Landis camp has made much of "sloping baselines" in graphs that show the result of Landis' tests. An arrow-straight line at the bottom of the page represents a cleanly produced test, Davis said. He said sloping baselines, or baselines with minor peaks, show bad methods. He said the baseline on a particularly bad example looked like a "squashed hedgehog."

WEDNESDAY'S WITNESSES: Davis returns. Depending on his testimony, USADA could bring rebuttal witnesses, including J. Thomas Brenna. Arbitrators had hoped to wrap up with closing arguments in the afternoon, but that plan is in limbo.

MORE:
New York Times: Landis's Character Is the Focus of Questioning
AP: Tour Director Says Doping 'Killing' Cycling
Deutschse Welle:
Team T-Mobile Under Fire from Doping Admissions
Denver Post:
Vaughters' cyclists welcome weekly exams

No comments:

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Day 8: The Floyd Landis Hearing

A brief look at Day 8 of the Bad Boy Floyd arbitration hearing:

HIGHLIGHTS: Many observers thought USADA would stick to the science, and the Landis side would try to put on a big show. In fact, the opposite has happened. USADA's decision to bring Greg LeMond to the stand has turned this into an examination of Landis' character, as well, which is what Tuesday morning's cross-examination was all about. But do the arbitrators care?

LOWLIGHTS: Landis had another good witness, Simon Davis, who was compelling in his dissection of practices at the French lab. But if the Landis team's strategy was to get word of Davis' scientific testimony to the public, Landis' cross-examination proved to be too much competition.

LAB WORKERS GONE WILD: Davis ripped lab technicians Cynthia Mongongu and Claire Frelat, saying they "clearly did not understand the instrument" they used to manually reprocess data and claiming that some of their testimony "shows a complete lack of understanding of the instrument."

CHEMICAL REACTIONS: The Landis camp has made much of "sloping baselines" in graphs that show the result of Landis' tests. An arrow-straight line at the bottom of the page represents a cleanly produced test, Davis said. He said sloping baselines, or baselines with minor peaks, show bad methods. He said the baseline on a particularly bad example looked like a "squashed hedgehog."

WEDNESDAY'S WITNESSES: Davis returns. Depending on his testimony, USADA could bring rebuttal witnesses, including J. Thomas Brenna. Arbitrators had hoped to wrap up with closing arguments in the afternoon, but that plan is in limbo.

MORE:
New York Times: Landis's Character Is the Focus of Questioning
AP: Tour Director Says Doping 'Killing' Cycling
Deutschse Welle:
Team T-Mobile Under Fire from Doping Admissions
Denver Post:
Vaughters' cyclists welcome weekly exams

No comments: