Wednesday, April 04, 2007

The Nike Cycling Psyche

If you wear Nike when you cycle, don't wear out what you already have too fast.
Helen Jung of the Oregonian newspaper in Portland writes that Nike plans to drop most of its cycling apparel and footwear line for consumers as the company narrows its focus to outfitting cycling teams and Nike-endorser athletes.
And if your cycling equation includes Trek, well ... Nike's seven-year relationship with Trek Bicycle Corp., which produces clothing and shoes for cyclists under the shoe company's brand, will not be renewed after it ends this year.
Nike will continue to distribute its Discovery Channel line, Lance Armstrong 10//2 collection, and specialty jerseys.
The pullback was first reported on a local Portland blog bikeportland.org (no, you can't believe everything you read in a blog -- that doesn't apply to this one! -- but blogs are a good place to get a hint of what may be about to happen; mainstream media isn't the only source of information in a 24/4 world in which everyone can be a publisher).
The blog concluded that pullback reflects the difficulty Nike has had making a name for itself among established cycling brands such as Sidi, Shimano and Castelli.
And, Jung reports, the move also highlights Nike's corporate soul-searching of late as it reorganizes to focus on its core consumer businesses of running, basketball, soccer, men's training, women's fitness and sport culture.
Nike has developed cycling footwear and apparel for years, but it launched its most aggressive effort after cancer survivor Lance Armstrong's first Tour de France win in 1999. At that time, Nike and Trek began discussions about jointly producing cycling apparel and footwear.
The deal was signed in 2000 and the first Swoosh-branded products from Trek began appearing in 2001.
Nike benefited greatly from its endorsement by Our Boy Lance and from Trek's expertise. But Armstrong retired from racing in 2006 and, in the end, even his celebrity wasn't enough.
Maybe that's something that people in the sport should be thinking about rather than the usual doping sideshow.

1 comment:

bdleaf said...

Time to start collecting Nike gear now, eh? Potential collectors items if that is all true...

Wednesday, April 04, 2007

The Nike Cycling Psyche

If you wear Nike when you cycle, don't wear out what you already have too fast.
Helen Jung of the Oregonian newspaper in Portland writes that Nike plans to drop most of its cycling apparel and footwear line for consumers as the company narrows its focus to outfitting cycling teams and Nike-endorser athletes.
And if your cycling equation includes Trek, well ... Nike's seven-year relationship with Trek Bicycle Corp., which produces clothing and shoes for cyclists under the shoe company's brand, will not be renewed after it ends this year.
Nike will continue to distribute its Discovery Channel line, Lance Armstrong 10//2 collection, and specialty jerseys.
The pullback was first reported on a local Portland blog bikeportland.org (no, you can't believe everything you read in a blog -- that doesn't apply to this one! -- but blogs are a good place to get a hint of what may be about to happen; mainstream media isn't the only source of information in a 24/4 world in which everyone can be a publisher).
The blog concluded that pullback reflects the difficulty Nike has had making a name for itself among established cycling brands such as Sidi, Shimano and Castelli.
And, Jung reports, the move also highlights Nike's corporate soul-searching of late as it reorganizes to focus on its core consumer businesses of running, basketball, soccer, men's training, women's fitness and sport culture.
Nike has developed cycling footwear and apparel for years, but it launched its most aggressive effort after cancer survivor Lance Armstrong's first Tour de France win in 1999. At that time, Nike and Trek began discussions about jointly producing cycling apparel and footwear.
The deal was signed in 2000 and the first Swoosh-branded products from Trek began appearing in 2001.
Nike benefited greatly from its endorsement by Our Boy Lance and from Trek's expertise. But Armstrong retired from racing in 2006 and, in the end, even his celebrity wasn't enough.
Maybe that's something that people in the sport should be thinking about rather than the usual doping sideshow.

1 comment:

bdleaf said...

Time to start collecting Nike gear now, eh? Potential collectors items if that is all true...