Monday, March 12, 2007

Never Mind

News flash:
The judge leading the investigation into a cycling doping ring (Operation Puerto) has closed the case without making any charges after concluding that no offenses were committed under Spanish law.
How do you like them apples, Jan? Ivan?
In a ruling released on Monday, judge Antonio Serrano said that doping practices had occurred but that there was insufficient evidence to prosecute for the offense of endangering public health.
Kinda reminds me of the Black Sox Scandal. They got off, too, but Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis tossed the scoundrels from baseball for life. Wanna bet that Judge Serrano is no Mountain Landis?
Doping itself was not punishable under Spanish law when the charges were brought in May last year and the judge said that the case was not subject to new legislation introduced in February designed to deal with people who supply and administer drugs in sport.
"This case took place because of a lack of fair play to say the least," Serrano said.
"Sport has become a branch of industry where it is judged by profitability and has lost much of its original function in transmitting moral values such as fair play."
How do you like them apples?!
The decision will be seen as a huge blow to the fight against doping in cycling and could open the way for the accused to seek compensation.

No comments:

Monday, March 12, 2007

Never Mind

News flash:
The judge leading the investigation into a cycling doping ring (Operation Puerto) has closed the case without making any charges after concluding that no offenses were committed under Spanish law.
How do you like them apples, Jan? Ivan?
In a ruling released on Monday, judge Antonio Serrano said that doping practices had occurred but that there was insufficient evidence to prosecute for the offense of endangering public health.
Kinda reminds me of the Black Sox Scandal. They got off, too, but Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis tossed the scoundrels from baseball for life. Wanna bet that Judge Serrano is no Mountain Landis?
Doping itself was not punishable under Spanish law when the charges were brought in May last year and the judge said that the case was not subject to new legislation introduced in February designed to deal with people who supply and administer drugs in sport.
"This case took place because of a lack of fair play to say the least," Serrano said.
"Sport has become a branch of industry where it is judged by profitability and has lost much of its original function in transmitting moral values such as fair play."
How do you like them apples?!
The decision will be seen as a huge blow to the fight against doping in cycling and could open the way for the accused to seek compensation.

No comments: