Tuesday, March 27, 2007

J'acuse

What goes around comes around.
When Ivan Basso came under suspicion in the Spanish doping scandal, it seemed to me that his team, CSC, and director sportif Bjarne Riis were not very supportive and ultimately cast him aside. Maybe they know something we don't, but I wasn't particularly impressed.
Now, Riis is dismissing an allegation from a former team masseur that he used doping substances en route to his Tour de France title in 1996.
Riis said in a statement that he had never been close to Jef D'hont during his time at Team Telekom. Riis, who is Danish, won the '96 Tour for the German team and is now head of the CSC team.
"I have never had a particularly close relation with Jef D'hont and he has no validation for the allegations he is making," Riis said.
"There will always be someone out there trying to make money by talking about the past and in my opinion that is probably what he is trying to do here."
D'hont said in an interview with Belgium television on Sunday that Riis was under the influence of the forbidden blood doping substance EPO when he won the Tour in 1996. He said he could not produce evidence because he burnt that in 1998 during a police investigation against the Festina team, whose riders named him a key figure in supplying doping substances.
You have to wonder why this is all coming up now.
But then, you always have to wonder.
That's the problem with cycling.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2007

J'acuse

What goes around comes around.
When Ivan Basso came under suspicion in the Spanish doping scandal, it seemed to me that his team, CSC, and director sportif Bjarne Riis were not very supportive and ultimately cast him aside. Maybe they know something we don't, but I wasn't particularly impressed.
Now, Riis is dismissing an allegation from a former team masseur that he used doping substances en route to his Tour de France title in 1996.
Riis said in a statement that he had never been close to Jef D'hont during his time at Team Telekom. Riis, who is Danish, won the '96 Tour for the German team and is now head of the CSC team.
"I have never had a particularly close relation with Jef D'hont and he has no validation for the allegations he is making," Riis said.
"There will always be someone out there trying to make money by talking about the past and in my opinion that is probably what he is trying to do here."
D'hont said in an interview with Belgium television on Sunday that Riis was under the influence of the forbidden blood doping substance EPO when he won the Tour in 1996. He said he could not produce evidence because he burnt that in 1998 during a police investigation against the Festina team, whose riders named him a key figure in supplying doping substances.
You have to wonder why this is all coming up now.
But then, you always have to wonder.
That's the problem with cycling.

No comments: