Sunday, March 25, 2007

Bikes On The Side

1: The back cog drives the back wheel chain, which unlike on a normal bike can turn either way when the back handlebar is steered.
2:Back handlebar which steers the back wheel and has a rear light.
3:Front handlebar which steers the front wheel and has a light and rear-view mirror.
4:Pedals are at right angles to the wheels.
5:The seat is shaped like an upside-down crescent.
6:This frame goes over the lap of the cyclist, but can go under if preferred.

Seems to me that just pointing the front wheel straight ahead is the best way to ride a bicycle, but some people have other ideas. But now, here's the Sideways Bike, the bright idea of Michael Killian, a 46-year-old Dubliner and software engineer, who invented the thing. How does it work? The cyclist sits sideways (naturally and operates a wheel with each hand; pedalling makes the bike travel sideways.
Got that?
"You're moving sideways and operating on a different balance system in your head," Killian explains. "It's a front-to-back balance, not a left-to-right like a normal bike. That affords you tremendous grace and motion. It's dance-like. The advantages are in the motion. It's never going to win you the Tour de France. But it's mesmerising and entertaining."

No comments:

Sunday, March 25, 2007

Bikes On The Side

1: The back cog drives the back wheel chain, which unlike on a normal bike can turn either way when the back handlebar is steered.
2:Back handlebar which steers the back wheel and has a rear light.
3:Front handlebar which steers the front wheel and has a light and rear-view mirror.
4:Pedals are at right angles to the wheels.
5:The seat is shaped like an upside-down crescent.
6:This frame goes over the lap of the cyclist, but can go under if preferred.

Seems to me that just pointing the front wheel straight ahead is the best way to ride a bicycle, but some people have other ideas. But now, here's the Sideways Bike, the bright idea of Michael Killian, a 46-year-old Dubliner and software engineer, who invented the thing. How does it work? The cyclist sits sideways (naturally and operates a wheel with each hand; pedalling makes the bike travel sideways.
Got that?
"You're moving sideways and operating on a different balance system in your head," Killian explains. "It's a front-to-back balance, not a left-to-right like a normal bike. That affords you tremendous grace and motion. It's dance-like. The advantages are in the motion. It's never going to win you the Tour de France. But it's mesmerising and entertaining."

No comments: