Monday, March 12, 2007

Bad Boy Floyd Time

Well, I was right about Bad Boy Floyd.
Steve Lipsher, who writes for the Denver Post, reports that our second-favorite cycling fundraiser was in a Denver suburban bike shop Sunday (while David Millar was winning the prologue to Paris-Nice) to pad his legal defense fund.
"I'm confident if I get a fair hearing, I'll be proven innocent," BBF said at a news conference before a town-hall meeting at Bicycle Village. Floyd has been making these pay-to-be-with-me appearances as part of the Floyd Fairness Foundation, which has raised more than $500,000 toward the $2 million that organizers believe will be required to clear his name.
Just to keep things noble, Landis also hopes to change the international drug-testing system, arguing that results should be completely confidential until an athlete has been granted due process.
"We can't go back and do something again. But I'd like to change the system so that until there's a final outcome, no one is convicted in the press," Landis said.
Wearing a gray suit, blue shirt and striped tie -- he must be dressing better these days -- Landis received a standing ovation from the group of about 125 people, for whom he answered questions.

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Monday, March 12, 2007

Bad Boy Floyd Time

Well, I was right about Bad Boy Floyd.
Steve Lipsher, who writes for the Denver Post, reports that our second-favorite cycling fundraiser was in a Denver suburban bike shop Sunday (while David Millar was winning the prologue to Paris-Nice) to pad his legal defense fund.
"I'm confident if I get a fair hearing, I'll be proven innocent," BBF said at a news conference before a town-hall meeting at Bicycle Village. Floyd has been making these pay-to-be-with-me appearances as part of the Floyd Fairness Foundation, which has raised more than $500,000 toward the $2 million that organizers believe will be required to clear his name.
Just to keep things noble, Landis also hopes to change the international drug-testing system, arguing that results should be completely confidential until an athlete has been granted due process.
"We can't go back and do something again. But I'd like to change the system so that until there's a final outcome, no one is convicted in the press," Landis said.
Wearing a gray suit, blue shirt and striped tie -- he must be dressing better these days -- Landis received a standing ovation from the group of about 125 people, for whom he answered questions.

No comments: